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History of Arakan Martial Art

Arakan is a Burmese martial art from the Rakhine region of Burma (Myanmar) 

Arakan is traditionally known as Rakhine Thaing, Arakan Martial Art being the literal English translation. Thaing is the Burmese word for martial arts and refers to the many fighting arts of Burma (Myanmar) including the more well-known forms such as Lethwei (Burmese boxing), Ban-do, Ban-shay, and Naban (meaning wrestling).

Burma is a country with enormous ethnic diversity with 135 different ethnic groups officially recognised by the Burmese Government. Many unrecognised ethnic groups exist.

There are many indigenous martial arts from Burma based on differing ethnicities and regions. Some of these including Shan Thaing, Kayin Thaing, Kachin Thaing, Mon Thaing and Rakhine Thaing (literally translated as Arakan Martial Art).

As Burma borders India and China, Burma's many forms of martial arts have been influenced by the Chinese and the Indian martial arts and also Thai arts.

The Arakan region is located on the Western side of Burma and shares close proximity to China, India and Bangladesh. Arakan history dates back to as far back as 2666 B.C and has had an excess of 145 kings divided up into a number of dynasties.

Rakhine Thaing (Arakan Martial Art) was an indigenous art of the region. The Rakhine hills tribes developed their own style of martial movements which included the use of most parts of the body as well as weapons such as sticks and various forms of Da (sword). This form of martial art was recruited to the Rakhine palace during the Danyawaddy Dynasty to serve as the protection for the royals.

 
Arakan Martial Art was introduced to Australia in 1993 by Robert Kyaw who was raised from an early age as an Arakan Martial Art practitioner and is a direct descendant of Arakan Martial Art practitioners in Burma.

Arakan Martial Art is now taught throughout Australia in Melbourne, Sydney, Brisbane, Gold Coast, Perth and Newcastle.

Arakan Martial Art has been moulded and adapted to suit the needs of the modern society in the western world. Arakan Martial Art is not (and never been) a ring or a competition based style; it is perfectly practical and adaptable to self defence situations which you may face in society today. 

Arakan Martial Art utilises many parts of the body including open hands, closed hands, fists, legs, elbows, knees (and just about every part of the body) in a free flowing manner.

Arakan Martial Art movements involves striking, deflecting, grasping, manipulating, locking and using an opponent‘s momentum against themselves. Arakan Martial Art utilises knees and kicks which are aimed at below the waist level. Practitioners are proficient in close quarters combat situations as well as in longer range situations. Arakan Martial art is fast, powerful, unique, interesting, fluid and practical, and is highly effective for self-protection purposes against one or even multiple attackers should the need ever arise. 

Arakan practitioners are highly skilled at disarming knives and bats, as well as being highly proficient at using many exotic weapons including sticks, swords, knives, daggers, double daggers and much more. Morden day Arakan members are taught to utilize and adapt to many varied environments and scenarios such as in a real night club, inside a car, a home and much more.

Please follow the links below for more information:

Ethnic groups in Burma

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_ethnic_groups_in_Burma

 

Map of Burma

http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/map/myanmar_map2.htm

 

List of Arakanese monarchs

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Arakanese_monarchs

Green Belt Grading

I think events and pressure situations, such as an Arakan Martial Art grading are good for us, as they give us an understanding of what we are capable of when we put our entire energy into something. For me this opportunity came with the series of Green belt gradings I did through-out 2017 and the final one this year... READ MORE

Orange Belt Grading

he Orange Belt journey for me was an amazing process, that only after grading am I truly appreciating. Arakan has positively influenced my life in many ways and i have felt through the grading process those life changes accelerate as I was pushed through my comfort zone again and again forming new and more powerful habits... READ MORE